Amino Acids Overview

Uses

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Twenty amino acids are needed to build the various proteins used in the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues. Eleven of these amino acids can be made by the body itself, while the other nine (called essential amino acids) must come from the diet. The essential amino acids are isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine. Another amino acid, histidine, is considered semi-essential because the body does not always require dietary sources of it. The nonessential amino acids are arginine, alanine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, proline, serine, and tyrosine. Other amino acids, such as carnitine and taurine, are used by the body in ways other than protein-building and are often used therapeutically. L-Theanine is an amino acid found in tea that is said to help relieve stress. Beta-alanine has been used to prevent fatigue during exercise.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
Liver Cirrhosis
18 grams daily of L-ornithine-L-aspartate
As both a supplement and injection, L-ornithine-L-aspartate has been shown to significantly improve liver function, mental status, and brain function.

L-ornithine-L-aspartate (OA) is a nutritional supplement that has been investigated as a treatment for cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. In a double-blind trial, participants taking 18 grams of OA for 14 days had significant improvements in liver function, mental status, and brain function. Similar benefits have also been demonstrated using injections of OA.

1 Star
Athletic Performance
Refer to label instructions
Aspartic acid is an amino acid that participates in many biochemical reactions relating to energy and protein. Research suggests that it may help reduce fatigue during exercise.
Aspartic acid is a non-essential amino acid that participates in many biochemical reactions relating to energy and protein. Preliminary, though conflicting, animal and human research suggested a role for aspartic acid (in the form of potassium and magnesium aspartate) in reducing fatigue during exercise. However, most studies have found aspartic acid useless in improving either athletic performance or the body's response to exercise.

How It Works

How to Use It

Nutrition experts recommend that protein, as a source of amino acids, account for 10-12% of the calories in a balanced diet. However, requirements for protein are affected by age, weight, state of health, and other factors. On average, a normal adult requires approximately 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight. Using this formula, a 140-pound person would need 50 grams (or less than 2 ounces) of protein per day. An appropriate range of protein intake for healthy adults may be as low as 45-65 grams daily. Some athletes have higher amino acid requirements.1 Most American adults eat about 100 grams of protein per day, or about twice what their bodies need and at least as much as any athlete requires.

Supplements of individual amino acids are recommended by doctors for specific purposes, such as lysine for herpes or phenylalanine for pain.

Where to Find It

Foods of animal origin, such as meat and poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products, are the richest dietary sources of the essential amino acids. Plant sources of protein are often deficient in one or more essential amino acids. However, these deficiencies can be overcome by consuming a wide variety of plant foods. For example, grains are low in lysine, whereas beans provide an excess of lysine. It was previously believed that, in order for vegetarians to obtain adequate amounts of protein, all of the essential amino acids had to be "balanced" at each meal. For example, a grain and a bean had to be consumed at the same meal. However, more recent research has indicated that, while consuming a proper mix of amino acids is important, it is not necessary to consume them all at the same meal.2

Possible Deficiencies

The vast majority of Americans eats more than enough protein and also more than enough of each essential amino acid for normal purposes. Dieters, some strict vegetarian body builders, and anyone consuming an inadequate number of calories may not be consuming adequate amounts of amino acids. In these cases, the body will break down the protein in muscle tissue and use those amino acids to meet the needs of more important organs or will simply not build more muscle mass despite increasing exercise.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

Amino acids include several different nutrients, each of which has the potential to interact with drugs. Look up the unique interactions for each and discuss the potential benefits and risks of your current medications with your doctor or pharmacist before adding amino acids:

Interactions with Medicines

Certain medicines interact with this supplement.

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • Abiraterone

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Acalabrutinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Aldesleukin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Alemtuzumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Amifostine Crystalline

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Anastrozole

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Arsenic Trioxide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Asparaginase

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Axitinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Azacitidine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • AZT

    Preliminary information suggests that muscle damage sometimes caused by AZT is at least partially due to depletion of carnitine in the muscles by the drug. It has been reported that most patients taking AZT have depleted carnitine levels that can be restored with carnitine supplementation (6 grams per day).

  • BCG Live

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Belinostat

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Bexarotene

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Bicalutamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Bleomycin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Bortezomib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Bosutinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Busulfan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cabazitaxel

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cabozantinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Capecitabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Carbamazepine

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Carboplatin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Carfilzomib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Carmustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cefditoren Pivoxil
    In a case report, a woman developed visual disturbances and abnormal brain function, in association with subnormal blood levels of carnitine, after treatment with cefditoren pivoxil. The abnormalities resolved after supplementation with L-carnitine. People taking cefditoren pivoxil should ask their doctor whether taking an L-carnitine supplement is appropriate.
  • Ceritinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cetuximab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Chlorambucil

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cisplatin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cladribine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Clofarabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Clozapine

    Some people who take clozapine become mentally depressed after taking the drug for a few weeks. Studies have shown that clozapine can reduce blood levels of the amino acid L-tryptophan, which is often deficient in people with depression. More controlled research is needed to determine whether the interaction is significant and whether individuals taking clozapine might benefit from supplemental L-tryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP).

  • Crizotinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cromolyn

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cyclophosphamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cytarabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Cytarabine Liposome

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Dabrafenib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Dactinomycin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Dasatinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Daunorubicin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Daunorubicin Liposome

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Decitabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Degarelix

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Denileukin Diftitox

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Dexrazoxane

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Diclofenac

    Diclofenac causes complex changes to L-tryptophan levels in the blood, but the clinical implications of this are unknown. More research is needed to determine whether supplementation with L-tryptophan is a good idea for people taking diclofenac.

  • Docetaxel

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Doxorubicin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Doxorubicin Liposomal

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Enzalutamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Epirubicin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Eribulin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Erlotinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Estramustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Etoposide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Etoposide Phosphate

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Everolimus

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Exemestane

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Felbamate

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Floxuridine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Fludarabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Fluorouracil

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Flutamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Fulvestrant

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Gefitinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Gemcitabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Goserelin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Hydroxyurea

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ibrutinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Idarubicin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ifosfamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Imatinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Interferon Alfa-2a

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Interferon Alfa-2B

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ipilimumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Irinotecan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Irinotecan Liposomal

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ixabepilone

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ixazomib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Kit For Indium-111-Ibritumomab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Kit For Yttrium-90-Ibritumomab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Lapatinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Lenalidomide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Lenvatinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Letrozole

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Leucovorin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Leuprolide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Leuprolide (3 Month)

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Leuprolide (4 Month)

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Leuprolide (6 Month)

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Levamisole

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Levetiracetam

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Levoleucovorin Calcium

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Lomustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Mechlorethamine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Medroxyprogesterone

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Megestrol

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Melphalan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Mercaptopurine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Mesna

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Methotrexate
    Glutathione , the main antioxidant found within cells, is frequently depleted in individuals on chemotherapy and/or radiation. Preliminary studies have found that intravenously injected glutathione may decrease some of the adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiation, such as diarrhea.
  • Methoxsalen

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Midostaurin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Mitomycin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Mitotane

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Mitoxantrone

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Necitumumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Nelarabine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Nilotinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Nilutamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Nintedanib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ofatumumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Oxaliplatin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Oxcarbazepine

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Paclitaxel

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Paclitaxel-Protein Bound

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Panitumumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Panobinostat

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pazopanib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pegaspargase

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Peginterferon Alfa-2b

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pemetrexed

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pentostatin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pertuzumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Phenobarbital
    One controlled study showed that taking phenobarbital resulted in reduced blood levels of L-carnitine.[REF] Further research is needed to determine whether people taking phenobarbital might benefit from supplemental L-carnitine. Based on the currently available information, some healthcare practitioners may recommend monitoring L-carnitine blood levels or supplementing with L-carnitine.
  • Phenytoin

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Plicamycin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pomalidomide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Ponatinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Pralatrexate

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Primidone

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Regorafenib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Romidepsin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Samarium Sm 153 Lexidronam

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Sipuleucel-T In Lr

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Sorafenib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Sulfacetamide

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Sunitinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Tamoxifen

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Temsirolimus

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • TeniposIde

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Testolactone

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Thioguanine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Thiotepa

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Topiramate

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Topotecan

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Toremifene

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Trametinib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Trastuzumab

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Tretinoin (Chemotherapy)

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Triptorelin Pamoate

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Uracil Mustard

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Valrubicin

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Vandetanib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Vemurafenib

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Vinblastine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Vincristine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposomal

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Vinorelbine

    Taurine has been shown to be depleted in people taking chemotherapy. It remains unclear how important this effect is or if people taking chemotherapy should take taurine supplements.

  • Zonisamide

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

Reduce Side Effects

  • Abiraterone

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Acalabrutinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Aldesleukin

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Alemtuzumab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Amifostine Crystalline

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Anastrozole

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Arsenic Trioxide

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Asparaginase

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Axitinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Azacitidine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • AZT

    Severe peripheral neuropathy (painful sensations due to nerve damage in the hands and feet) often develops in people taking stavudine or other drugs in its class. People with peripheral neuropathy who were taking one of these drugs were found to be deficient in acetyl-L-carnitine. In a preliminary trial, supplementing with 1,500 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine twice a day resulted in improvement in the neuropathy after six months in people taking stavudine or related drugs. Similar benefits were seen in another study that used the same amount of acetyl-L-carnitine.

  • BCG Live

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Belinostat

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Bevacizumab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Bexarotene

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Bicalutamide

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Bleomycin

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Bortezomib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Bosutinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Busulfan

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Cabazitaxel

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Cabozantinib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Capecitabine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Carboplatin

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Carfilzomib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Carmustine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Ceritinib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Cetuximab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Chlorambucil

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Cisplatin

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Cladribine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all, double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Clofarabine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Crizotinib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Cromolyn

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Cyclophosphamide

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Cytarabine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Cytarabine Liposome

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Dabrafenib

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Dactinomycin

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Dasatinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Daunorubicin

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Daunorubicin Liposome

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Decitabine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Degarelix

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Denileukin Diftitox

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Dexrazoxane

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Didanosine

    Severe peripheral neuropathy (painful sensations due to nerve damage in the hands and feet) often develops in people taking didanosine or other drugs in its class. People with peripheral neuropathy who were taking one of these drugs were found to be deficient in acetyl-L-carnitine. In a preliminary trial, supplementation with 1,500 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine twice a day resulted in improvement in the neuropathy after six months in people taking didanosine or related drugs. Similar benefits were seen in another study that used the same amount of acetyl-L-carnitine.

  • Docetaxel

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Doxorubicin

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Doxorubicin Liposomal

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Emtricitabine

    Severe peripheral neuropathy (painful sensations due to nerve damage in the hands and feet) often develops in people taking stavudine or other drugs in its class. People with peripheral neuropathy who were taking one of these drugs were found to be deficient in acetyl-L-carnitine. In a preliminary trial, supplementing with 1,500 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine twice a day resulted in improvement in the neuropathy after six months in people taking stavudine or related drugs. Similar benefits were seen in another study that used the same amount of acetyl-L-carnitine.

  • Enzalutamide

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Epirubicin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Eribulin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Erlotinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Estramustine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Etoposide

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Etoposide Phosphate

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Everolimus

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Exemestane

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Floxuridine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Fludarabine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Fluorouracil

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Flutamide

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Fulvestrant

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Gefitinib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Gemcitabine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Goserelin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Hydroxyurea

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Ibrutinib

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Idarubicin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Ifosfamide

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Imatinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Interferon Alfa-2a

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Interferon Alfa-2B

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Interferon Alfacon-1
    In a randomized trial, patients with chronic hepatitis C who were being treated with Peg-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine (2 grams twice a day) or no L-carnitine (control group). Compared with the control group, fewer patients in the L-carnitine group had to reduce the medication dosage or discontinue treatment because of side effects such as anemia or a decline in the white blood cell count.
  • Ipilimumab

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Irinotecan

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Irinotecan Liposomal

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Isoniazid
    Some drugs used to treat tuberculosis (including isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide) may cause liver damage. In a double-blind study of patients starting treatment for tuberculosis with the combination of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide, supplementation with L-carnitine (1,000 mg twice a day for 4 weeks) significantly decreased the number of patients who developed drug-induced liver damage (17% with L-carnitine, 32% with placebo).
  • Ixabepilone

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Ixazomib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Kit For Indium-111-Ibritumomab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Kit For Yttrium-90-Ibritumomab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Lamivudine

    Severe peripheral neuropathy (painful sensations due to nerve damage in the hands and feet) often develops in people taking stavudine or other drugs in its class. People with peripheral neuropathy who were taking one of these drugs were found to be deficient in acetyl-L-carnitine. In a preliminary trial, supplementing with 1,500 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine twice a day resulted in improvement in the neuropathy after six months in people taking stavudine or related drugs. Similar benefits were seen in another study that used the same amount of acetyl-L-carnitine.

  • Lapatinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Lenalidomide

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Lenvatinib

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Letrozole

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Leucovorin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Leuprolide

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Leuprolide (3 Month)

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Leuprolide (4 Month)

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Leuprolide (6 Month)

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Levamisole

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Levoleucovorin Calcium

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Lomustine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Mechlorethamine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Medroxyprogesterone

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Megestrol

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Melphalan

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Mercaptopurine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Mesna

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Methotrexate

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Methoxsalen

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Midostaurin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Mitomycin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Mitotane

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Mitoxantrone

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Necitumumab

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Nelarabine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Nilotinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Nilutamide

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Nintedanib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Obinutuzumab

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Ofatumumab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Oxaliplatin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Paclitaxel

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Paclitaxel-Protein Bound

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Panitumumab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Panobinostat

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Pazopanib

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Pegaspargase

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Peginterferon Alfa-2a
    In a randomized trial, patients with chronic hepatitis C who were being treated with Peg-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine (2 grams twice a day) or no L-carnitine (control group). Compared with the control group, fewer patients in the L-carnitine group had to reduce the medication dosage or discontinue treatment because of side effects such as anemia or a decline in the white blood cell count.
  • Peginterferon Alfa-2b
    In a randomized trial, patients with chronic hepatitis C who were being treated with Peg-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine (2 grams twice a day) or no L-carnitine (control group). Compared with the control group, fewer patients in the L-carnitine group had to reduce the medication dosage or discontinue treatment because of side effects such as anemia or a decline in the white blood cell count.
  • Pemetrexed

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Pentostatin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Pertuzumab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Plicamycin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all, double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Pomalidomide

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Ponatinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Pralatrexate

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Pyrazinamide
    Some drugs used to treat tuberculosis (including isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide) may cause liver damage. In a double-blind study of patients starting treatment for tuberculosis with the combination of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide, supplementation with L-carnitine (1,000 mg twice a day for 4 weeks) significantly decreased the number of patients who developed drug-induced liver damage (17% with L-carnitine, 32% with placebo).
  • Regorafenib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Ribavirin
    In a randomized trial, patients with chronic hepatitis C who were being treated with Peg-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine (2 grams twice a day) or no L-carnitine (control group). Compared with the control group, fewer patients in the L-carnitine group had to reduce the medication dosage or discontinue treatment because of side effects such as anemia or a decline in the white blood cell count.
  • Rifampin
    Some drugs used to treat tuberculosis (including isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide) may cause liver damage. In a double-blind study of patients starting treatment for tuberculosis with the combination of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide, supplementation with L-carnitine (1,000 mg twice a day for 4 weeks) significantly decreased the number of patients who developed drug-induced liver damage (17% with L-carnitine, 32% with placebo).
  • Rituximab-Hyaluronidase,Human

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Romidepsin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Samarium Sm 153 Lexidronam

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Sipuleucel-T In Lr

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Sorafenib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Stavudine

    Severe peripheral neuropathy (painful sensations due to nerve damage in the hands and feet) often develops in people taking stavudine or other drugs in its class. People with peripheral neuropathy who were taking one of these drugs were found to be deficient in acetyl-L-carnitine. In a preliminary trial, supplementing with 1,500 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine twice a day resulted in improvement in the neuropathy after six months in people taking stavudine or related drugs. Similar benefits were seen in another study that used the same amount of acetyl-L-carnitine.

  • Sulfacetamide

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Sunitinib

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Tamoxifen

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Temsirolimus

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • TeniposIde

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Testolactone

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Thioguanine

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Thiotepa

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by cisplatin.

  • Topotecan

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Toremifene

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Trametinib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Trastuzumab

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Tretinoin (Chemotherapy)

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Triptorelin Pamoate

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Uracil Mustard

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Valrubicin

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Vandetanib

    Acetyl-L-carnitine in the amount of 1,000 mg three times per day for eight weeks has been shown to improve nerve damage (neuropathy) caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

  • Vemurafenib

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Vinblastine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all, double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Vincristine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposomal

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Vinorelbine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

    In a double-blind study, supplementation with 18 grams of glutamine per day for 15 days, starting five days before the beginning of 5-FU therapy, significantly reduced the severity of drug-induced intestinal toxicity.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Zidovudine

    Severe peripheral neuropathy (painful sensations due to nerve damage in the hands and feet) often develops in people taking stavudine or other drugs in its class. People with peripheral neuropathy who were taking one of these drugs were found to be deficient in acetyl-L-carnitine. In a preliminary trial, supplementing with 1,500 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine twice a day resulted in improvement in the neuropathy after six months in people taking stavudine or related drugs. Similar benefits were seen in another study that used the same amount of acetyl-L-carnitine.

Support Medicine

  • Allopurinol

    In a preliminary study, seven of eight individuals with severe mental depression showed improvement when they took L-tryptophan and allopurinol; of these seven, five experienced full remission. Controlled research is necessary to determine whether this combination might be more effective for severe depression than standard treatment.

  • Amitriptyline

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Amoxapine

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Asenapine

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Benztropine

    Akathisia is an adverse reaction to anti-psychotic drugs, where a person has an uncontrollable desire to be in constant motion. One preliminary report suggested that 4,000 mg of L-tryptophan and 25 mg niacin per day taken with benztropine enhances the treatment of akathisia. Controlled studies are necessary to determine whether L-tryptophan and niacin supplements might benefit most people taking benztropine who experience adverse reactions to anti-psychotic drugs.

  • Clomipramine

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Clozapine

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Desipramine

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Doxepin

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Haloperidol

    Two double-blind studies have found that 0.4-0.8 mg/kg body weight per day of glycine can reduce the so-called negative symptoms of schizophrenia when combined with haloperidol and related drugs. Negative symptoms include reduced emotional expression or general activity. The action of glycine in combination with the drugs was greater than the drugs alone, suggesting a synergistic action. Another double-blind study using approximately half the amount in the positive studies could not find any benefit from adding glycine to antipsychotic drug therapy. Patients with low blood levels of glycine appeared to improve the most when given glycine in addition to their antipsychotic drugs. No side effects were noticed in these studies, even when more than 30 grams of glycine were given daily.

  • Iloperidone

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Imipramine

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Lithium

    A small double-blind study found that combining 2-4 grams three times per day of L-tryptophan with lithium significantly improved symptoms in people with bipolar disorder or a mild form of schizophrenia. L-tryptophan is only available from doctors. It should be taken several hours before or after meals.

  • Lomustine

    Though cancer cells use glutamine as a fuel source, studies in humans have not found that glutamine stimulates growth of cancers in people taking chemotherapy. In fact, animal studies show that glutamine may actually decrease tumor growth while increasing susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapy, though such effects have not yet been studied in humans.

    Glutamine has successfully reduced chemotherapy-induced mouth sores. In one trial, people were given 4 grams of glutamine in an oral rinse, which was swished around the mouth and then swallowed twice per day. Thirteen of fourteen people in the study had fewer days with mouth sores as a result. These excellent results have been duplicated in some, but not all, double-blind research. In another study, patients receiving high-dose paclitaxel and melphalan had significantly fewer episodes of oral ulcers and bleeding when they took 6 grams of glutamine four times daily along with the chemotherapy.

    One double-blind trial suggested that 6 grams of glutamine taken three times per day can decrease diarrhea caused by chemotherapy. However, other studies using higher amounts or intravenous glutamine have not reported this effect.

    Intravenous use of glutamine in people undergoing bone marrow transplants, a procedure sometimes used to allow very high amounts of chemotherapy to be used, has led to reduced hospital stays, leading to a savings of over $21,000 for each patient given glutamine.

  • Lurasidone

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Nortriptyline

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Olanzapine

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Olanzapine Pamoate

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Paliperidone

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Paliperidone Palm (3-Month)

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Paliperidone Palmitate

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Protriptyline

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Quetiapine

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Risperidone

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Risperidone Microspheres

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Selegiline

    Both L-tryptophan and 5-HTP have been used to treat depression. One controlled study showed that taking selegiline at the same time as 5-HTP enhanced the antidepressant effect when compared with 5-HTP alone. Further research is needed to determine whether taking selegiline and 5-HTP together might result in unwanted side effects.

  • Trimipramine

    Combination of 6 grams per day L-tryptophan and 1,500 mg per day niacinamide (a form of vitamin B3) with imipramine has shown to be more effective than imipramine alone for people with bipolar disorder. These levels did not improve the effects of imipramine in people with depression. Lower amounts (4 grams per day of L-tryptophan and 1,000 mg per day of niacinamide) did show some tendency to enhance the effect of imipramine.

    The importance of the amount of L-tryptophan was confirmed in other studies, suggesting that if too much L-tryptophan (6 grams per day) is used, it is not beneficial, while levels around 4 grams per day may make tricyclic antidepressants work better.

  • Ziprasidone

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

  • Ziprasidone Mesylate

    In a small double-blind study, people with schizophrenia being treated with risperidone experienced an improvement in their symptoms when glycine was added to their treatment regimen. The initial amount of glycine used was 4 grams per day; this was increased gradually over a period of 10 to 17 days to a maximum of 0.8 grams per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day.

Reduces Effectiveness

  • Clozapine

    The use of glycine may interfere with the efficacy of clozapine as an antipsychotic drug. In a double-blind trial, people with chronic, treatment-resistant schizophrenia were given clozapine (400-1,200 mg per day) and either glycine (30 g per day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The combination of clozapine and glycine was not effective at decreasing symptoms. In contrast, participants who took clozapine without glycine had a 35% reduction in some symptoms. Therefore, the combination should be avoided until more is known.

Potential Negative Interaction

  • Almotriptan

    Triptans work by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with eletriptan could increase eletriptan-induced side effects. However, no interactions have yet been reported with eletriptan and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Citalopram

    Citalopram increases serotonin activity in the brain. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking either of these compounds with citalopram may increase citalopram-induced side effects. Dietary supplements of L-tryptophan (available only by prescription from special compounding pharmacists) taken with paroxetine (a drug that has similar actions as citalopram) caused headache, sweating, dizziness, agitation, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms.

    Some doctors have used small amounts of L-tryptophan in combination with SSRIs, to increase their effectiveness. However, because of the potential for side effects, 5-HTP and L-tryptophan should never be taken in combination with citalopram or other SSRIs, unless a doctor is closely monitoring the combination. Foods rich in L-tryptophan do not appear to interact with citalopram or other SSRIs.

  • Eletriptan

    Eletriptan works by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with eletriptan could increase eletriptan-induced side effects. However, no interactions have yet been reported with eletriptan and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Escitalopram

    Escitalopram increases serotonin activity in the brain. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking either of these compounds with escitalopram may increase escitalopram-induced side effects. Dietary supplements of L-tryptophan (available only by prescription from special compounding pharmacists) taken with paroxetine (a drug that has similar actions as escitalopram) caused headache, sweating, dizziness, agitation, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms.

    Some doctors have used small amounts of L-tryptophan in combination with SSRIs, to increase their effectiveness. However, because of the potential for side effects, 5-HTP and L-tryptophan should never be taken in combination with escitalopram or other SSRIs, unless a doctor is closely monitoring the combination. Foods rich in L-tryptophan do not appear to interact with escitalopram or other SSRIs.

  • Fluoxetine

    L-tryptophan is an amino acid found in protein-rich foods. Foods rich in L-tryptophan are not believed to cause any problems during fluoxetine use. However, dietary supplements of L-tryptophan taken during fluoxetine treatment have been reported to cause headache, sweating, dizziness, agitation, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms.

  • Fluvoxamine

    Fluvoxamine works by increasing serotonin activity in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with fluvoxamine may increase fluvoxamine-induced side effects. Until more is known, 5-HTP and L-tryptophan should not be taken with any SSRI drug, including fluvoxamine.

  • Frovatriptan

    Triptans work by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them at the same time as 5-HT1 agonists could increase unwanted side effects. However, at the time of this writing there are no known interactions with 5-HT1 agonists and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Olanzapine-Fluoxetine

    Triptans work by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them at the same time as 5-HT1 agonists could increase unwanted side effects. However, at the time of this writing there are no known interactions with 5-HT1 agonists and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Paroxetine

    Paroxetine increases serotonin activity in the brain. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking either of these compounds with paroxetine may increase paroxetine-induced side effects. Dietary supplements of L-tryptophan (available only by prescriptions from special compounding pharmacists) taken with paroxetine caused headache, sweating, dizziness, agitation, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. Some doctors have used small amounts of L-tryptophan in combination with SSRIs, to increase the effectiveness of the latter. However, because of the potential for side effects, 5-HTP and L-tryptophan should never be taken in combination with paroxetine or other SSRIs, unless the combination is being closely monitored by a doctor. Foods rich in L-tryptophan do not appear to interact with paroxtine or other SSRIs.

    On the other hand, the combination of 45 mg DL-tryptophan (a synthetic variation of L-tryptophan) per pound of body weight (a relatively high dose) with zimelidine, a drug with a similar action to paroxetine, did not cause these side effects in another trial.

  • Paroxetine Mesylate

    Sertraline increases serotonin activity in the brain. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking either of these compounds with sertraline may increase sertraline-induced side effects.

    In one report, dietary supplements of L-tryptophan (available only by prescriptions from special compounding pharmacists) taken with paroxetine (a drug similar to sertraline) caused headache, sweating, dizziness, agitation, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. On the other hand, the combination of 45 mg DL-tryptophan (a synthetic variation of L-tryptophan) per pound of body weight (a relatively high dose) with zimelidine, a drug with a similar action to sertraline, did not cause these side effects in another trial. Some doctors have used small amounts of L-tryptophan in combination with SSRIs, to increase the effectiveness of the latter. However, because of the potential for side effects, 5-HTP and L-tryptophan should never be taken in combination with sertraline or other SSRIs, unless the combination is being closely monitored by a doctor. Foods rich in L-tryptophan do not appear to interact with sertraline or other SSRIs.

  • Rizatriptan

    Triptans work by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them at the same time as 5-HT1 agonists could increase unwanted side effects. However, at the time of this writing there are no known interactions with 5-HT1 agonists and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Sertraline

    Sertraline increases serotonin activity in the brain. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking either of these compounds with sertraline may increase sertraline-induced side effects.

    In one report, dietary supplements of L-tryptophan (available only by prescriptions from special compounding pharmacists) taken with paroxetine (a drug similar to sertraline) caused headache, sweating, dizziness, agitation, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. On the other hand, the combination of 45 mg DL-tryptophan (a synthetic variation of L-tryptophan) per pound of body weight (a relatively high dose) with zimelidine, a drug with a similar action to sertraline, did not cause these side effects in another trial. Some doctors have used small amounts of L-tryptophan in combination with SSRIs, to increase the effectiveness of the latter. However, because of the potential for side effects, 5-HTP and L-tryptophan should never be taken in combination with sertraline or other SSRIs, unless the combination is being closely monitored by a doctor. Foods rich in L-tryptophan do not appear to interact with sertraline or other SSRIs.

  • Sibutramine

    The amino acids L-tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) are occasionally used to treat mental depression. Taking sibutramine with L-tryptophan or 5-HTP might result in a rare, but serious group of symptoms known as "serotonin syndrome." Symptoms associated with serotonin syndrome may include confusion, anxiety, muscle weakness, incoordination, and vomiting. Therefore, individuals taking sibutramine should avoid supplementing with L-tryptophan and 5-HTP.

  • Sumatriptan

    Sumatriptan works by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with sumatriptan could increase sumatriptan-induced side effects. However, no interactions have yet been reported with sumatriptan and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Sumatriptan Succinate

    Sumatriptan works by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with sumatriptan could increase sumatriptan-induced side effects. However, no interactions have yet been reported with sumatriptan and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Tramadol

    Tramadol, which blocks serotonin reuptake in the brain, has been associated with two cases of serotonin syndrome. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain. While no interactions have yet been reported with tramadol and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan, taking 5-HTP or L-tryptophan with tramadol may increase the risk of tramadol-induced side effects, including serotonin syndrome.

  • Venlafaxine

    Venlafaxine, a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been associated with several cases of serotonin syndrome. 5-HTP and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with venlafaxine may increase venlafaxine-induced side effects. While no interactions with venlafaxine and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan have been reported, until more is known, people taking venlafaxine are cautioned to avoid 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Zolmitriptan

    Sumatriptan works by stimulating serotonin receptors in the brain. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with sumatriptan could increase sumatriptan-induced side effects. However, no interactions have yet been reported with sumatriptan and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

  • Zolpidem

    Nine cases of zolpidem-induced hallucinations associated with serotonin reuptake inhibiting antidepressants have been reported, some lasting for several hours. 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) and L-tryptophan are converted to serotonin in the brain, and taking them with zolpidem may increase zolpidem-induced hallucinations, though no interactions have yet been reported with zolpidem and 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

Explanation Required

  • Allopurinol

    People who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy have low levels of L-carnitine in their muscles. Allopurinol restores L-carnitine to normal levels, resulting in improved muscle strength. Whether L-carnitine supplementation might improve this effect of allopurinol has not been investigated.

  • Clorazepate

    Test tube studies show that L-tryptophan and clorazepate dipotassium interact in the blood in such a way that the actions of the drug may be enhanced when high amounts of L-tryptophan are ingested. Controlled research is needed to determine the significance of this interaction and to investigate possible interactions between clorazepate and 5-hydroxytryptophan, a supplement related to L-tryptophan.

  • Gabapentin

    Several controlled and preliminary studies showed that multiple drug therapy for seizures results in dramatic reductions in blood carnitine levels. Further controlled research is needed to determine whether children taking anticonvulsants might benefit by supplementing with L-carnitine, since current studies yield conflicting results. For example, one controlled study indicated that children taking valproic acid and carbamazepine received no benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine. However, another small study revealed that children taking valproic acid experienced less fatigue and excessive sleepiness following L-carnitine supplementation. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, individuals who are taking anticonvulsants and experiencing side effects might benefit from supplementing with L-carnitine.

  • Paclitaxel

    Glutathione , the main antioxidant found within cells, is frequently depleted in individuals on chemotherapy and/or radiation. Preliminary studies have found that intravenously injected glutathione may decrease some of the adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiation, such as diarrhea.

  • Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine

    High-dose cisplatin chemotherapy is associated with kidney toxicity and damage, which may be reduced by glutathione administration. Nerve damage is another frequent complication of high amounts of cisplatin. Preliminary evidence has shown that glutathione injections may protect nerve tissue during cisplatin therapy without reducing cisplatin's anti-tumor activity. There is no evidence that glutathione taken by mouth has the same benefits.

  • Valproate

    Valproic acid causes depletion of carnitine in children, and blood carnitine levels are often low in people taking valproic acid for long periods of time. While there have been several case reports of valproic acid-related carnitine deficiency causing abdominal pain in children, there is controversy about the need for carnitine supplements in children taking valproic acid.

    Complete disappearance of severe valproic acid-induced abdominal pain was achieved in one child with intractable epilepsy immediately following the introduction of 300 mg per day of L-carnitine. Carnitine supplementation (50 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight) has protected children from valproic acid-induced increases in blood ammonia levels in some research, though other published work has questioned whether the depletion of carnitine and the increase in blood ammonia levels (both caused by valproic acid) are actually related to each other. This last report found that the depletion of carnitine was significantly more severe when epileptics were taking valproic acid together with other anti-seizure medications. A double-blind, crossover study found that carnitine supplementation (100 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight) was no more effective than placebo in improving the sense of well-being in children treated with valproic acid. To date, the question of whether carnitine supplementation is beneficial for people taking valproic acid remains unresolved. However, a panel of pediatric neurologists and experts on L-carnitine supplementation strongly recommended oral L-carnitine supplementation for all infants and children taking valproic acid, as well as for adults with carnitine deficiency syndromes, people with valproic acid-induced liver and kidney toxicity, people on kidney dialysis, and premature infants on total parenteral nutrition (intravenous feeding). The panel recommended an amount of 100 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day, up to a maximum of 2 grams per day.

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

Many Western diets provide more protein than the body needs, causing excess nitrogen to be excreted as urea in urine. The excess nitrogen has been linked in some studies with reduced kidney function in old age. Some, but not all studies have found that when people have impaired kidney function, restricting dietary intake of protein slows the rate of decline of kidney function.3

Excessive protein intake also can increase excretion of calcium, and some evidence has linked high-protein diets with osteoporosis,4 particularly regarding animal protein.5 On the other hand, some protein is needed for bone formation. A double-blind study showed that elderly people whose diets provided slightly less than the recommended amount of protein suffered less bone loss if they consumed an additional 20 grams of protein per day.6 A doctor can help people assess their protein intake and needs.

Amino acids include several different nutrients, each of which has the potential for side effects. Look up the unique side effects for each and discuss the potential benefits and risks with your doctor or pharmacist:

References

1. Lemon PW. Is increased dietary protein necessary or beneficial for individuals with a physically active lifestyle? Nutr Rev 1996;54:S169-75 [review].

2. Young VR, Pellett PL. Plant proteins in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;59(suppl):1203S-12S.

3. Sitprija V, Suvanpha R. Low protein diet and chronic renal failure in Buddhist monks. BMJ 1983;287:469-71.

4. Heaney R. Protein intake and the calcium economy. J Am Diet Assoc 1993;93:1259-60 [review].

5. Abelow BJ, Holford TR, Insogna KL. Cross-cultural association between dietary animal protein and hip fracture: a hypothesis. Calcif Tiss Int 1992;50:14-8.

6. Schürch MA, Rizzoli R, Slosman D, et al. Protein supplements increase serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels and attenuate proximal femur bone loss in patients with recent hip fracture. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Ann Intern Med 1998;128:801-9.

 

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