Skip to main content

HIV Screening

Overview

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all people should get tested for HIV as part of their regular medical care.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends HIV testing:footnote 1

  • As part of regular medical care for people 15 to 65 years old.
  • For anyone who is pregnant.
  • For people younger than 15 and older than 65 if they have a high risk for HIV, such as for people who engage in high-risk behavior. High-risk behavior includes men having sex with other men. It also can mean having multiple sex partners. (If you or your partner[s] don't identify with the sex you were assigned at birth, talk to your doctor about your risk.)

You and your doctor can decide if testing is right for you.

Where can you be tested for HIV?

You can get HIV testing done in most doctors' offices, public health clinics, hospitals, and Planned Parenthood clinics. You can also buy a home HIV test kit (saliva test) in a drugstore or by mail order. But be very careful to choose only a test that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). If a home test is positive, you'll need to see a doctor to have the result confirmed and to find out what to do next.

References

Citations

  1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, et al. (2019). Screening for HIV infection: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA, published online June 11, 2019. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.6587. Accessed June 12, 2019

Credits

Current as of: February 9, 2022

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Peter Shalit MD, PhD - Internal Medicine

 

PeaceHealth endeavors to provide comprehensive health care information, however some topics in this database describe services and procedures not offered by our providers or within our facilities because they do not comply with, nor are they condoned by, the ethics policies of our organization.