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Postcholecystectomy Syndrome

Topic Overview

Postcholecystectomy syndrome sometimes occurs when abdominal symptoms develop after surgery to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). About 5% to 40% of people who have the gallbladder removed may experience symptoms.footnote 1

Symptoms of postcholecystectomy syndrome may include:

  • Upset stomach, nausea, and vomiting.
  • Gas, bloating, and diarrhea.
  • Persistent pain in the upper right abdomen.

Your doctor may be able to give you medicine to help with some of these symptoms.

If pain continues, you may have a problem caused by something other than the gallbladder or a gallstone. Other possible causes of abdominal pain include irritable bowel syndrome, stomach (peptic) ulcers, or pancreatitis.

References

Citations

  1. Glasgow RE, Mulvihill SJ (2010). Treatment of gallstone disease. In M Feldman et al., eds., Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease, 9th ed., vol. 1, pp. 1121–1138. Philadelphia: Saunders.

Credits

Current as of: August 12, 2019

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Arvydas D. Vanagunas MD - Gastroenterology

 

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