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Intraoperative Cholangiogram

Surgery Overview

An intraoperative cholangiogram is a procedure that is sometimes done during the surgery to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). The doctor places a small tube called a catheter into the cystic duct, which drains bile from the gallbladder into the common bile duct. A dye that blocks X-rays is injected into the common bile duct, and then you will have X-rays taken.

You may have intraoperative cholangiogram to:

  • Look for gallstones that may be in the common bile duct.
  • Allow the surgeon to see the anatomy of the bile duct system from the liver to the small intestine. Viewing the bile ducts before removal of the gallbladder may help ensure that the surgeon does not accidentally cut or damage the common bile duct.

Risks

There are some risks of having an intraoperative cholangiogram.

Some complications include:

  • Infection and bleeding.
  • Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis).
  • Damage to the common bile duct.

Credits

Current as of: October 28, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Arvydas D. Vanagunas MD - Gastroenterology

 

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