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Watch out for the flu


March 15, 2022 | Wellness | Healthy You

Person sneezes into tissue

Communities are seeing a rise in influenza.

Spring is around the corner and although influenza activity is low compared to past years, PeaceHealth is seeing an uptick in cases of the flu in our communities.

While COVID-19 cases are decreasing and mask mandates are easing, it’s important to continue to protect yourself and your family from the flu. 

CDC Flu Facts

  • The CDC recommends everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot.
  • The vaccine can help prevent you from getting the flu and lessen your symptoms if you do get it. 
  • The flu vaccine will reduce your risk of getting the flu, being hospitalized and possibly dying from it – or potentially spreading it to others.
  • You can get your influenza vaccine and COVID-19 vaccine at the same time.
  • It is possible to be infected with several viruses – such as the flu, coronavirus and common respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) – at once.
  • People at high risk for serious complications from flu include:
    • Young children.
    • Pregnant women.
    • People 65 years and older.
    • People who suffer from chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart or lung disease.

Protecting yourself

  • Get vaccinated against the flu.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Stay home if you're not feeling well. 
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes.

Watch out for the flu


March 15, 2022 | Wellness | Healthy You
Person sneezes into tissueCommunities are seeing a rise in influenza.

Spring is around the corner and although influenza activity is low compared to past years, PeaceHealth is seeing an uptick in cases of the flu in our communities.

While COVID-19 cases are decreasing and mask mandates are easing, it’s important to continue to protect yourself and your family from the flu. 

CDC Flu Facts

  • The CDC recommends everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot.
  • The vaccine can help prevent you from getting the flu and lessen your symptoms if you do get it. 
  • The flu vaccine will reduce your risk of getting the flu, being hospitalized and possibly dying from it – or potentially spreading it to others.
  • You can get your influenza vaccine and COVID-19 vaccine at the same time.
  • It is possible to be infected with several viruses – such as the flu, coronavirus and common respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) – at once.
  • People at high risk for serious complications from flu include:
    • Young children.
    • Pregnant women.
    • People 65 years and older.
    • People who suffer from chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart or lung disease.

Protecting yourself

  • Get vaccinated against the flu.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Stay home if you're not feeling well. 
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes.