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Lupus and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

Topic Overview

About 1 out of 3 people with lupus produce an antibody that attacks certain blood-clotting factors, which can cause the blood to clot easily.footnote 1 A person who has this antibody and has had blood clots is said to have antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This can lead to mild or severe blood-clotting complications, including:

A blood test can detect antiphospholipid antibodies. When diagnosed, the condition is usually treated with anticoagulants. Pregnant women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome need to be closely monitored.

References

Citations

  1. Crow MK (2016). Systemic lupus erythematosus. In L Goldman, A Shafer, eds., Goldman-Cecil Medicine, 24th ed., vol. 2, pp. 1769–1777. Philadelphia: Saunders.

Credits

Current as of: August 5, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Anne C. Poinier MD - Internal Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Nancy Ann Shadick MD, MPH - Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

 

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