Dental Sealants

Topic Overview

A dental sealant is a clear or white, liquid-plastic material put on the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. The sealant bonds into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of teeth and protects them from tooth decay and cavities. Although children and teens usually use sealants, adults can use them, too.

To put in a sealant, your dentist or dental hygienist will place a cotton roll around your teeth to absorb saliva and prevent moisture from getting on the teeth. A sheet of rubber (rubber dam) may be used to isolate the teeth. The dentist, dental hygienist, or a dental assistant will first apply the solution that will glue the sealant to the tooth. After about a minute, he or she will rinse off the excess glue, dry your teeth, and put on the sealant.

One type of sealant hardens very quickly through the use of a bright light. The other hardens more gradually.

Sealants may wear down over a period of years. Your dentist should check them regularly and reapply them if needed.

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Wright JA, et al. (2016). Evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the use of pit-and-fissure sealants. A report of the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Journal of the American Dental Association 147-8: 672-682.e12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adaj.2016.06.001. Accessed August 8, 2017.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Arden Christen, DDS, MSD, MA, FACD - Dentistry

Current as ofFebruary 27, 2018

 

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