Isolated Systolic High Blood Pressure

Topic Overview

In isolated systolic high blood pressure (isolated systolic hypertension, or ISH), systolic blood pressure is elevated (130 mm Hg or higher), but diastolic blood pressure stays below 80 mm Hg. This type of high blood pressure is more common in older adults, especially older women. In fact, the majority of people older than 60 who have hypertension have isolated systolic hypertension.

A systolic blood pressure of 130 mm Hg or higher is an important risk factor for stroke and heart disease.

Your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes to lower your blood pressure. Depending how high your blood pressure is and your overall risk for a heart attack or stroke, your doctor may also talk to you about taking medicines to help lower blood pressure more.

Lifestyle changes include eating healthy with the DASH diet, losing weight, being active, limiting sodium, and limiting alcohol.

Medicines include:

Related Information

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Aronow WS, et al. (2011). ACCF/AHA 2011 Expert consensus document on hypertension in the elderly: A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Task Force on Clinical Expert Consensus Documents. Circulation, 123(21): 2434-2506.
  • Whelton PK, et al. (2017). 2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and management of high blood pressure in adults. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, published online November 13, 2017. DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.11.006. Accessed November 20, 2017.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD - Cardiology

Current as ofDecember 19, 2017

 

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