Premature Infant's Inability to Maintain Body Heat

A premature infant's body is not able to maintain body heat. It's important to prevent hypothermia, which is a loss of body heat that can be dangerous. So the infant is kept warm on a heated bed. This may be inside a draft-free enclosure (isolette or incubator) or under a radiant heater.

As the infant's nervous system, skin, and metabolism mature, the infant is less likely to get hypothermia. At about 34 weeks' gestation, or about 4 lb (2 kg), a premature infant usually can be moved into an open crib.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Sarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
John Pope, MD - Pediatrics
Specialist Medical Reviewer Jennifer Merchant, MD - Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Current as ofMay 4, 2017

 
 

PeaceHealth endeavors to provide comprehensive health care information, however some topics in this database describe services and procedures not offered by our providers or within our facilities because they do not comply with, nor are they condoned by, the ethics policies of our organization.