Speech-Language Pathologist (Speech Therapist)

Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help prevent speech, language, and communication disorders.

Speech-language pathologists work with people who cannot make speech sounds or cannot make them clearly; have speech rhythm and fluency problems, such as stuttering; have voice quality problems, such as an inappropriate pitch or harsh voice; have problems understanding and producing language; have cognitive communication problems, such as attention, memory, and problem-solving disorders; or have oral motor problems that cause eating and swallowing difficulties. Speech pathologists work in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, rehabilitation facilities, schools, and private practices.

A speech-language pathologist has a master's degree in speech and language and has completed postgraduate clinical work under the supervision of a licensed speech-language pathologist.

Speech-language pathologists can acquire the certificate of clinical competence in speech-language pathology (CCC-SLP) offered by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

 
 

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