Alpha Ketoglutarate (AKG)

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Uses

AKG (alpha-ketoglutarate) is the nitrogen-free portion of the amino acids known as glutamine and glutamic acid. It is formed in the Krebs cycle, the energy-producing process that occurs in most body cells. AKG is used by cells during growth and in healing from injuries and other wounds,1 and is especially important in the healing of muscle tissue.2 A controlled study found that intravenous AKG prevented a decline in protein synthesis in the muscles of patients recovering from surgery.3 , 4 For these reasons, it has been speculated that oral AKG supplements might help improve strength or muscle-mass gains by weightlifters, but no research has been done to test this theory.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Athletic Performance
Refer to label instructions
AKG is used by cells during growth and is especially important in healing muscle tissue. It has been speculated that AKG supplements might help improve strength or muscle-mass gains by weight lifters.
AKG (alpha-ketoglutarate) is used by cells during growth and in healing from injuries and other wounds, and is especially important in the healing of muscle tissue. A controlled study found that intravenous AKG prevented a decline in protein synthesis in the muscles of patients recovering from surgery. For these reasons, it has been speculated that oral AKG supplements might help improve strength or muscle-mass gains by weight lifters, but no research has been done to test this theory.
1 Star
Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
Refer to label instructions
AKG is used by cells during growth and in healing from injuries and other wounds, and is especially important in the healing of muscle tissue.

AKG (alpha-ketoglutarate) is used by cells during growth and in healing from injuries and other wounds, and is especially important in the healing of muscle tissue. Controlled studies have found intravenous AKG helpful for supporting protein synthesis, which often declines as a result of surgery, and for protecting the heart muscle from damage during heart surgery, but no research has investigated whether oral AKG would be similarly effective.

How It Works

How to Use It

Only intravenous AKG has been used in research studies; no reliable information about desirable oral amounts is available.

Where to Find It

AKG is present in many foods and is synthesized for use in dietary supplements.

Possible Deficiencies

AKG is not an essential nutrient, and no deficiency has been reported.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Aussel C, Coudray-Lucas C, Lasnier E, et al. Alpha-Ketoglutarate uptake in human fibroblasts. Cell Biol Int 1996;20:359-63.

2. Wernerman J, Hammarqvist F, Vinnars E. Alpha-ketoglutarate and postoperative muscle catabolism. Lancet1990;335:701-3.

3. Blomqvist BI, Hammarqvist F, von der Decken A, Wernerman J. Glutamine and alpha-ketoglutarate prevent the decrease in muscle free glutamine concentration and influence protein synthesis after total hip replacement. Metabolism1995;44:1215-22.

4. Hammarqvist F, Wernerman J, von der Decken A, Vinnars E. Alpha-ketoglutarate preserves protein synthesis and free glutamine in skeletal muscle after surgery. Surgery1991;109:28-36.