Uses

Pyruvate (the buffered form of pyruvic acid) is a product created in the body during the metabolism of carbohydrates and protein.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
3 Stars
Obesity
6 to 10 grams daily combined with an exercise program
Combining exercise with pyruvate may help speed up your metabolism.
Pyruvate, a compound that occurs naturally in the body, might aid weight-loss efforts. A controlled trial found that pyruvate supplements (22 to 44 grams per day) enhanced weight loss and resulted in a greater reduction of body fat in overweight adults consuming a low-fat diet. Three controlled trials combining 6 to 10 grams per day of pyruvate with an exercise program reported greater effects on weight loss and body fat than that seen with a placebo plus the exercise program. Animal studies suggest that pyruvate supplementation leads to weight loss by increasing the resting metabolic rate.
2 Stars
Athletic Performance
100 grams of a combination of dihydroxyacetone and pyruvate
One group of researchers has reported that a combination of dihydroxyacetone and pyruvate enhanced the endurance of certain muscles.

One group of researchers in two small, controlled trials has reported that 100 grams of a combination of dihydroxyacetone and pyruvate enhanced the endurance of certain muscles in untrained men. Three controlled studies of untrained individuals using a combination of 6 to 10 grams per day of pyruvate and an exercise program reported greater effects on weight loss and body fat compared with those taking a placebo with the exercise program. However, in a study of healthy untrained women undergoing an exercise program, supplementing with 5 grams of pyruvate twice a day had no effect on exercise performance. Studies of pyruvate supplementation on exercise performance in trained athletes have also failed to demonstrate any beneficial effect. Seven grams per day did not improve aerobic exercise performance in cyclists, and an average of 15 grams per day did not improve anaerobic performance or body composition in football players. More recently, evidence has appeared casting doubt on the ability of high levels (an average exceeding 15 grams per day depending upon body weight) of pyruvate to improve exercise capacity in a weight-lifting study.

2 Stars
Athletic Performance and Improving Body Composition with Strength Training in Untrained People
Refer to label instructions
Three controlled studies of people using a combination of pyruvate and an exercise program reported positive effects on weight loss and body fat.

One group of researchers in two small, controlled trials has reported that 100 grams of a combination of dihydroxyacetone and pyruvate enhanced the endurance of certain muscles in untrained men. Three controlled studies of untrained individuals using a combination of 6 to 10 grams per day of pyruvate and an exercise program reported greater effects on weight loss and body fat compared with those taking a placebo with the exercise program. However, in a study of healthy untrained women undergoing an exercise program, supplementing with 5 grams of pyruvate twice a day had no effect on exercise performance. Studies of pyruvate supplementation on exercise performance in trained athletes have also failed to demonstrate any beneficial effect. Seven grams per day did not improve aerobic exercise performance in cyclists, and an average of 15 grams per day did not improve anaerobic performance or body composition in football players. More recently, evidence has appeared casting doubt on the ability of high levels (an average exceeding 15 grams per day depending upon body weight) of pyruvate to improve exercise capacity in a weight-lifting study.

How It Works

How to Use It

Most human research with pyruvate and weight loss has used at least 30 grams per day. However, such large amounts may not be necessary. In a six-week double-blind trial, as little as 6 grams per day of pyruvate in combination with exercise, led to greater weight loss and loss of body fat, compared with a placebo plus exercise.1

Where to Find It

Pyruvate is formed in the body as a byproduct of the normal metabolism of carbohydrates and protein and is present in several foods, including red apples, cheese, dark beer, and red wine. Dietary supplements of pyruvate are also available.

Possible Deficiencies

Because it is not an essential nutrient, pyruvate is not associated with a deficiency state.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

High intakes of pyruvate can trigger gastrointestinal upset, such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea. One preliminary study in exercising women found 10 grams per day of pyruvate reduced blood levels of HDL (the "good" cholesterol) after one month.2

References

1. Kalman D, Colker CM, Wilets I, et al. The effects of pyruvate supplementation on body composition in overweight individuals. Nutrition 1999;15:337-40.

2. Koh P, Kreider R, Ferreira M, et al. Effects of pyruvate supplementation during training on hematologic and metabolic profiles. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998;30:S155 [abstract].