Methylsulfonylmethane

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Uses

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring, organic, sulfur-containing compound related to another sulfur-containing substance, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). MSM is found in small amounts throughout nature and has been detected in small amounts in the blood and urine of humans.1

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
Osteoarthritis
2.25 to 6.0 grams per day
In one trial, supplementing with methyl-sulfonylmethane significantly reduced pain and improved overall physical functioning in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.
According to a small double-blind trial, 2,250 mg per day of oral methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), a variant of DMSO, reduced osteoarthritis pain after six weeks. In another double-blind trial, supplementation with 3 grams of MSM twice a day for 12 weeks significantly reduced pain and improved overall physical functioning in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

How It Works

How to Use It

Some authorities report anecdotally that 250-500 mg per day has beneficial effects on a variety of health problems.2 However, the only controlled trial using MSM used over 2000 mg per day to treat osteoarthritis. More research is needed before reliable recommendations for MSM supplementation can be made.

Where to Find It

A precursor of MSM is formed initially by ocean plankton and released into the atmosphere, where it interacts with ozone and sunlight and returns to earth as MSM in rainfall. MSM can be taken up by plants and incorporated into their structure, but no measurement of the MSM content of foods has been done. Supplements containing MSM are available.

Possible Deficiencies

Although MSM is present in food, it is not an essential nutrient, so deficiency is not likely.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

According to some anecdotal reports, MSM has been used in human research for many years in amounts above 2000 mg per day with no significant adverse effects.3 However, diarrhea, skin rash, headache, and fatigue may be experienced in less than 20% of people, according to other anecdotal reports. Detectable levels of MSM in the brain of a person taking MSM supplements have been reported,4 but the significance of this finding, if any, is unclear.

References

1. Jacob SW, Herschler R. Dimethyl sulfoxide after twenty years. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1983;411:xiii-xvii.

2. Jacob SW, Herschler R. Dimethyl sulfoxide after twenty years. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1983;411:xiii-xvii.

3. Jacob SW. Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, Oregon. Unpublished communication.

4. Rose SE, Chalk JB, Galloway GJ, Doddrell DM. Detection of dimethyl sulfone in the human brain by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Magn Reson Imaging 2000;18:95-8.