Uses

Malic acid is a naturally occurring compound that plays a role in the complex process of deriving adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the energy currency that runs the body) from food.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Fibromyalgia
Refer to label instructions
A preliminary trial found that a combination of magnesium and malic acid might lessen muscle pain in people with fibromyalgia.

A preliminary trial found that a combination of magnesium and malic acid might lessen muscle pain in people with fibromyalgia. The amounts used in this trial were 300-600 mg of elemental magnesium and 1,200-2,400 mg of malic acid per day, taken for eight weeks. A double-blind trial by the same research group using 300 mg magnesium and 1,200 mg malic acid per day found no reduction in symptoms, however. Though these researchers claimed that magnesium and malic acid appeared to have some effect at higher levels (up to 600 mg magnesium and 2,400 mg malic acid), the positive effects were not demonstrated under blinded study conditions. Therefore, the evidence supporting the use of these supplements for people with fibromyalgia remains weak and inconclusive.

How It Works

How to Use It

Healthy people do not need to take malic acid as a supplement. Research has been conducted with 1,200-2,400 mg of malic acid in combination with 300-600 mg of elemental magnesium.

Where to Find It

Malic acid is found in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, but the richest source is apples, which is why malic acid is sometimes referred to as "apple acid."

Possible Deficiencies

A deficiency in humans is unlikely, since the body can produce malic acid.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.