Uses

Botanical names:
Galium aparine

Parts Used & Where Grown

Cleavers grow in wet areas of Britain, Europe, Asia, and North America. Small prickles grow on the leaves of cleavers, causing it to have a sticky feeling and giving it its name. The leaves and flowers of cleavers are used medicinally.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Edema
Refer to label instructions
Cleavers is one of numerous plants considered in ancient times to act as a diuretic. It was therefore used to relieve edema and to promote urine formation during bladder infections.

Cleavers is one of numerous plants considered in ancient times to act as a diuretic. It was therefore used to relieve edema and to promote urine formation during bladder infections.

Traditional Use (May Not Be Supported by Scientific Studies)

Cleavers is one of numerous plants considered in ancient times to act as a diuretic.1 It was therefore used to relieve edema and to promote urine formation during bladder infections. It has also been used by people with lymph swellings, jaundice, and wounds.

How It Works

Botanical names:
Galium aparine

How It Works

Galiosin, an anthraquinone glycoside, other glycosides, tannins, and flavonoids may be the major constituents of cleavers. Little research has been conducted on this plant, but preliminary lab experiments suggest it may have antispasmodic activity.2

How to Use It

Cleavers tincture and tea are most widely recommended by herbal practitioners. Tincture (1/2-1 teaspoon or 3-5 ml) can be taken three times per day. Tea is made by steeping 2-3 teaspoons (10-15 grams) of the herb in 1 cup (250 ml) of hot water for ten to fifteen minutes. People can drink three or more cups per day.

Interactions

Botanical names:
Galium aparine

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

Certain medicines interact with this supplement.

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

Explanation Required

  • none

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Botanical names:
Galium aparine

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Mills SY. Out of the Earth: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. London: Viking Arkana, 1991, 493-4.

2. Mills SY. Out of the Earth: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. London: Viking Arkana, 1991, 493-4.