Drug Information

Lansoprazole is a “proton pump inhibitor” drug that blocks production of stomach acid. Lansoprazole is used to treat diseases in which stomach acid causes damage, including stomach and duodenal ulcers, esophagitis, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Common brand names:

Prevacid, Prevacid IV, Prevacid SoluTab

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • Calcium

    In a study of elderly women, administration of omeprazole decreased the absorption of calcium,1 presumably because the drug decreased the stomach's production of hydrochloric acid, which is necessary for calcium absorption. The form of calcium used in the study to test calcium absorption was calcium carbonate. Drugs that reduce stomach acid secretion may not inhibit other forms of calcium, such as calcium citrate.2

  • Folic Acid

    Folic acid is needed by the body to utilize vitamin B12. Antacids, including lansoprazole, inhibit folic acid absorption.3 People taking antacids are advised to supplement with folic acid.

  • Vitamin C

    Treatment of healthy volunteers with omeprazole for four weeks resulted in a 12.3% decrease in blood levels of vitamin C.4

  • Magnesium
    In a case report, a man developed severe magnesium deficiency after long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (pantoprazole or lansoprazole).5 Severe magnesium deficiency as a result of the use of proton pump inhibitors appears to be rare among people who have no other risk factors for magnesium deficiency. However, in a study of hospitalized patients, the prevalence of low serum magnesium levels was significantly greater among users of proton pump inhibitors than among nonusers (23% vs. 11%).6 People taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) should ask their doctor whether to take a magnesium supplement or whether to have their magnesium levels monitored.7
    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • Cranberry

    Omeprazole was shown to reduce protein-bound vitamin B12 absorption and cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) juice was shown to increase protein-bound vitamin B12 absorption in eight people treated with omeprazole (a drug closely related to lansoprazole).8 While this effect has not been studied with lansoprazole, people taking lansoprazole may choose to drink cranberry juice or other acidic liquids with vitamin B12-containing foods. Unlike vitamin B12 found in food, vitamin B12 found in supplements is not bound to peptides (pieces of protein). The absorption of B12 supplements therefore does not require acid and is unlikely to be improved by drinking cranberry juice.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • none

Explanation Required 

  • none

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

References

1. O'Connell MB, Madden DM, Murray AM, et al. Effects of proton pump inhibitors on calcium carbonate absorption in women: a randomized crossover trial. Am J Med 2005;118:778-81.

2. Recker RR. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria. N Engl J Med 1985;313:70-3.

3. Russell RM, Golner BB, Krasinski SD, et al. Effect of antacid and H2 receptor antagonists on the intestinal absorption of folic acid. J Lab Clin Med 1988;112:458-63.

4. Henry EB, Carswell A, Wirz A, et al. Proton pump inhibitors reduce the bioavailability of dietary vitamin C. Aliment Pharmacol Ther2005;22:539-5.

5. Regolisti G, Cabassi A, Parenti E, et al. Severe hypomagnesemia during long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Am J Kidney Dis 2010;56:168-74.

6. Gau JT, Yang YX, Chen R, Kao TC. Uses of proton pump inhibitors and hypomagnesemia. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2012;21:553-9.

7. FDA Drug Safety Communication: Low magnesium levels can be associated with long-term use of Proton Pump Inhibitor drugs (PPIs). U.S. Food and Drug Administration[cited 2011 Sept 13]. Available from URL: http://www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/ucm245011.htm#Additional_Information_for_Patients on.

8. Saltzman JR, Kemp JA, Golner BB, et al. Effect of hypochlorhydria due to omeprazole treatment or atrophic gastritis on protein-bound vitamin B12 absorption. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13:584-91.