Methyltestosterone

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Drug Information

Methyltestosterone is a hormone used in men to treat testosterone deficiency, and in women to treat breast cancer, as well as breast pain and swelling following pregnancy. It is also combined with estrogen (Estratest®) to treat symptoms associated with menopause.

Common brand names:

Android, Testred, Virilon, Methitest

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • Zinc

    Taking methyltestosterone increased the amount of zinc in the blood and hair of boys with short stature or growth retardation. It is not known whether this increase would occur in other people or whether zinc supplementation by people taking methyltestosterone would result in zinc toxicity. Until more is known, zinc supplementation should be combined with methyltestosterone therapy only under the supervision of a doctor.

Explanation Required 

  • Androstenedione

    Andro supplementation has been shown to increase blood levels of testosterone in women, but not in men. No studies have investigated the possible additive effects of taking andro and methyltestosterone, but either increased drug effectiveness or more severe side effects are possible. Until more is known, these agents should be combined only under the supervision of a doctor.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • DHEA

    DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone) supplementation has been shown to increase blood levels of testosterone, as does methyltestosterone. No studies have investigated the possible additive effects of taking DHEA and methyltestosterone, but either increased drug effectiveness or more severe side effects are possible. Until more is known, these agents should be combined only under the supervision of a doctor.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.