The Spiritual Care team knows that sometimes healing is accomplished through the combination of presence and conversation, as much as medical procedures. For those times when a patient, family member, or caregiver needs someone to be present with them, please know that chaplains are available. We meet with people of all religious and/or spiritual beliefs, honoring their path toward wellness and healing as well as offering assistance in the midst of grief and loss.

Staff Chaplain Margie Adams, MA, Pastoral Counseling

Chaplain Margie AdamsPeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center is committed to wholeness in patient and staff care—physical, emotional, spiritual and relational. Our staff chaplain and team of chaplain volunteers have many years of experience help the residents and visitors of the surrounding communities. We listen attentively and do everything we can to support you and your family in a way that is consistent with your own beliefs or spiritual needs.

A chaplain is available 24-hours a day to provide pastoral care for patients, family and staff.

What does the Chaplain do?

  • Valuing the life journey of each person as sacred.
  • Offering support during times of uncertainty, illness, fear, or loneliness.
  • Providing support through presence and resources at time of death and anticipating grief.
  • Helping restore the balance of mind, body and soul.
  • Affirming religious or cultural values of patients, families and staff.
  • Facilitating rituals, meditations and blessings.

A Chaplain may visit a patient before their minister is aware of the hospitalization. With the patient's permission, we can alert the clergy to their needs. The Chaplain can provide pastoral care and support until the patient's own minister arrives.

Support for Patients' Families

The Chaplain is available to help families of patients who may be seriously ill or dying.

In-House Pastor for Caregivers

In the often stressful, demanding healthcare environment, the Chaplain can provide a listening ear and a pastoral point of view for staff as they face professional or personal difficulties.

No One Dies Alone (NODA) Program

Occasionally, terminally ill patients come to PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center who have neither family nor close friends to be with them as they near the end of their life.  NODA is a volunteer program which provides the reassuring presence of a volunteer companion to dying patients.  With the support of the nursing staff, companions are able to assist patients through the death process.  PeaceHealth employees and volunteers interested in becoming Compassionate Companions can learn more about the NODA program by contacting Chaplain Margie Adams.

Contact

Spiritual Care
3100 Tongass Ave.
Ketchikan AK 99901
Phone: (907) 228-8300 Ext. 7960
Email: margie.a.adams@peacehealth.org

Coordinator

Margie Adams, Staff Chaplain

Office Hours:

Monday through Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 4:30p.m.