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Travel Tips for a Safe Summer Vacation


July 22, 2022 | Healthy You | Safety

Parents and two children put belongings into back of car for a trip

Follow these practical tips for COVID-19 free travel

With COVID-19 still circulating in our communities, it's important to take appropriate precautions to travel safely this summer, even if you and your family members are fully vaccinated.

Quick tips for a safe summer

To keep your family safe while traveling both internationally and in the U.S., experts recommend that you:

  • Make sure you are up-to-date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling.
  • Check your destination's COVID-19 restrictions and follow all local government policies.
  • Wear a mask indoors, on public transportation, and in crowded areas.
  • Check if your airline, train or other modes of transportation requires any COVID-19 testing or proof of vaccination.
  • Do not travel if you have COVID-19 symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19.

Know the conditions of where you're traveling

If you and your family members are fully vaccinated and boosted, experts say it's safe to travel this summer as long as you plan ahead and take precautions to protect yourself against COVID-19.

Most previously mandated COVID-19 rules are gone, and people can travel without wearing masks or showing their proof of vaccination—this includes international travel. But remember that new rules and regulations could be imposed at any time.

Before leaving on your vacation, check local conditions at your destination. This CDC map indicates the Community Levels in counties around the U.S. and the safety precautions the CDC recommends based on the risk present in the area.

The CDC also has this color-coded map for international travel. The U.S. Department of State provides links to COVID-19 information by country that may be helpful in determining the rules in place for different destinations.

Local governments may have masking or physical distancing requirements that are different from your home area. Prepare to be flexible as restrictions may change while traveling and require you to change your plans accordingly.

Choose lower-risk activities

Because COVID-19 spreads through the air, outside is safer than inside, and crowded indoor spaces with poor ventilation are the riskiest.

It is still highly recommended that people wear face coverings in many indoor public places and crowded outdoor gatherings. When possible, maintain a distance of 6 feet from people outside their household. Finally, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer after touching frequently touched surfaces, such as handrails, elevator buttons and kiosks.

Beaches, outdoor zoos and parks are all lower-risk activities. However, outdoor spaces can be risky depending on how many people are there. Consider dining outside a patio instead of a busy indoor restaurant.

Nightclubs, concerts in small venues, and crowded museums are examples of higher-risk activities.

Hotels have generally adopted many cleaning practices and upgraded indoor air filtration systems to limit the transmission of COVID-19. If you are still uncertain about staying overnight in one, consider renting a house or condo where you will be the sole party.

Make a packing list

When it's time to pack for your trip, consider adding these essential, safe travel supplies:

  • Face masks
  • Tissues
  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol)
  • Disinfectant wipes (at least 70% alcohol)
  • Thermometer
  • At-home rapid tests

When to cancel a trip

Unfortunately, you may plan the perfect vacation only to cancel because someone gets sick. While postponing a long-awaited trip can be disappointing and inconvenient, there are times when it is unsafe to travel.

The CDC recommends holding off on travel under the following circumstances:

  • You have COVID-19 symptoms.
  • You recently tested positive for COVID-19. Avoid traveling for 10 days after symptoms start or the positive test date.
  • You are waiting on the results of a COVID-19 test.
  • You recently had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

Purchasing a COVID-19 travel insurance policy may help offset some additional costs if you do have to postpone a trip due to COVID-19.

You may not be able to protect yourself against a delayed flight or lost luggage, but you can certainly travel safely this summer and avoid COVID-19 by following the precautions above. Happy travels.

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Travel Tips for a Safe Summer Vacation


July 22, 2022 | Healthy You | Safety
Parents and two children put belongings into back of car for a tripFollow these practical tips for COVID-19 free travel

With COVID-19 still circulating in our communities, it's important to take appropriate precautions to travel safely this summer, even if you and your family members are fully vaccinated.

Quick tips for a safe summer

To keep your family safe while traveling both internationally and in the U.S., experts recommend that you:

  • Make sure you are up-to-date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling.
  • Check your destination's COVID-19 restrictions and follow all local government policies.
  • Wear a mask indoors, on public transportation, and in crowded areas.
  • Check if your airline, train or other modes of transportation requires any COVID-19 testing or proof of vaccination.
  • Do not travel if you have COVID-19 symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19.

Know the conditions of where you're traveling

If you and your family members are fully vaccinated and boosted, experts say it's safe to travel this summer as long as you plan ahead and take precautions to protect yourself against COVID-19.

Most previously mandated COVID-19 rules are gone, and people can travel without wearing masks or showing their proof of vaccination—this includes international travel. But remember that new rules and regulations could be imposed at any time.

Before leaving on your vacation, check local conditions at your destination. This CDC map indicates the Community Levels in counties around the U.S. and the safety precautions the CDC recommends based on the risk present in the area.

The CDC also has this color-coded map for international travel. The U.S. Department of State provides links to COVID-19 information by country that may be helpful in determining the rules in place for different destinations.

Local governments may have masking or physical distancing requirements that are different from your home area. Prepare to be flexible as restrictions may change while traveling and require you to change your plans accordingly.

Choose lower-risk activities

Because COVID-19 spreads through the air, outside is safer than inside, and crowded indoor spaces with poor ventilation are the riskiest.

It is still highly recommended that people wear face coverings in many indoor public places and crowded outdoor gatherings. When possible, maintain a distance of 6 feet from people outside their household. Finally, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer after touching frequently touched surfaces, such as handrails, elevator buttons and kiosks.

Beaches, outdoor zoos and parks are all lower-risk activities. However, outdoor spaces can be risky depending on how many people are there. Consider dining outside a patio instead of a busy indoor restaurant.

Nightclubs, concerts in small venues, and crowded museums are examples of higher-risk activities.

Hotels have generally adopted many cleaning practices and upgraded indoor air filtration systems to limit the transmission of COVID-19. If you are still uncertain about staying overnight in one, consider renting a house or condo where you will be the sole party.

Make a packing list

When it's time to pack for your trip, consider adding these essential, safe travel supplies:

  • Face masks
  • Tissues
  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol)
  • Disinfectant wipes (at least 70% alcohol)
  • Thermometer
  • At-home rapid tests

When to cancel a trip

Unfortunately, you may plan the perfect vacation only to cancel because someone gets sick. While postponing a long-awaited trip can be disappointing and inconvenient, there are times when it is unsafe to travel.

The CDC recommends holding off on travel under the following circumstances:

  • You have COVID-19 symptoms.
  • You recently tested positive for COVID-19. Avoid traveling for 10 days after symptoms start or the positive test date.
  • You are waiting on the results of a COVID-19 test.
  • You recently had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

Purchasing a COVID-19 travel insurance policy may help offset some additional costs if you do have to postpone a trip due to COVID-19.

You may not be able to protect yourself against a delayed flight or lost luggage, but you can certainly travel safely this summer and avoid COVID-19 by following the precautions above. Happy travels.