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Ornithine Alpha-Ketoglutarate

Uses

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
Wound Healing
10 to 30 grams daily
Supplementing with OKG has been shown to significantly improve wound healing and decrease the length of hospital stays.

Preliminary1 and controlled2 studies of people with severe burns and other types of injuries3 showed that supplementation with 10–30 grams of ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG) per day significantly improved wound healing and decreased the length of hospital stays. Improved healing from major trauma and surgery has also been demonstrated with oral supplements including several grams per day of glutamine.4

1 Star
Athletic Performance
Refer to label instructions
Ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG) is believed to facilitate muscle growth by enhancing the body’s release of anabolic hormones, but this is based on effects seen in hospitalized and elderly people, not published research.

Ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG) is formed from the amino acids ornithine and glutamine and is believed to facilitate muscle growth by enhancing the body’s release of anabolic hormones. While this effect has been found in studies on hospitalized patients and elderly people,5 , 6 no studies on muscle growth in athletes using OKG have been published.

How It Works

How to Use It

Optimal levels remain unknown, though 10 grams per day has been used in clinical trials.

Where to Find It

Although the amino acids that comprise OKG are present in protein foods such as meat and poultry and fish, the OKG compound is found only in supplements.

Possible Deficiencies

A deficiency of OKG has not been reported.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Cynober L. Amino acid metabolism in thermal burns. JPEN 1989;13:196.

2. De Bandt JP, Coudray-Lucas C, Lioret N, et al. A randomized controlled trial of the influence of the mode of enteral ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate administration in burn patients. J Nutr 1998;128:563–9.

3. Cynober L. Ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate in nutritional support. Nutrition 1991;7:313–22 [review].

4. Romito RA. Early administration of enteral nutrients in critically ill patients. AACN Clin Issues 1995;6:242–56.

5. Le Boucher J, Cynober LA. Ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate: the puzzle. Nutrition 1998;14:870–3 [review].

6. Brocker P, Vellas B, Albarede J, et al. A two-centre, randomized, double blind trial of ornithine oxoglutarate in 194 elderly, ambulatory, convalescent subjects. Age Aging 1994;23:303–6.

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