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Adenosine Monophosphate

Uses

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Photosensitivity
Refer to label instructions
According to one report, about half of the people with porphyria cutanea tarda who took adenosine monophosphate saw complete alleviation of their photosensitivity.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a substance made in the body that is also distributed as a supplement, although it is not widely available. According to one report, 90% of people with porphyria cutanea tarda responded well to 160 to 200 mg of AMP per day taken for at least one month.1 Complete alleviation of photosensitivity occurred in about half of the people who took AMP.

1 Star
Shingles and Postherpetic Neuralgia
Refer to label instructions
Adenosine monophosphate has been found to speed healing, reduce the duration of pain of shingles, and prevent the development of postherpetic neuralgia.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP), a compound that occurs naturally in the body, has been found to be effective against shingles outbreaks. In one double-blind trial, people with an outbreak of shingles were given injections of either 100 mg of AMP or placebo three times a week for four weeks. Compared with the placebo, AMP promoted faster healing and reduced the duration of pain of the shingles.2 In addition, AMP appeared to prevent the development of postherpetic neuralgia.3 , 4

How It Works

How to Use It

The trials using AMP for photosensitivity have used 160–200 mg of AMP per day; however, the ideal intake of this supplement has not been determined. Research with shingles has used a special gel form of AMP injected into muscle; a doctor should be consulted for this form of AMP.

Where to Find It

The body creates AMP within cells during normal metabolic processes. AMP is also found as a supplement, although it is not widely available.

Possible Deficiencies

Preliminary research suggests that people with herpes simplex or herpes zoster (shingles) infections may have low levels of AMP; however, the clinical significance of this finding is unclear.5

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

The limited number of human studies involving oral AMP have not indicated any side effects. However, some researchers have expressed concern that supplemental intake of AMP could, in theory, increase levels of adenosine, a substance related to AMP that may interfere with immune function.6 Doctors using AMP injections report that too-rapid intravenous administration or inadvertent administration of an intramuscular injection into a vein could cause life-threatening arrhythmias of the heart.7

References

1. Gajdos A. AMP in porphyria cutanea tarda. Lancet 1974;I:163 [letter].

2. Bernstein JE, Korman NJ, Bickers DR, et al. Topical capsaicin treatment of chronic postherpetic neuralgia. J Am Acad Dermatol 1989;21:265–70.

3. Sklar SH, Blue WT, Alexander EJ, et al. Herpes zoster. The treatment and prevention of neuralgia with adenosine monophosphate. JAMA 1985;253:1427–30.

4. Sklar SH, Wigand JS. Herpes zoster. Br J Dermatol 1981;104:351–2.

5. Sklar SH. Herpes virus infection. JAMA 1977;237:871–2.

6. Sherlock CH, Corey L. Adenosine monophosphate for the treatment of varicella zoster infections: A large dose of caution. JAMA 1985;253:1444–5.

7. Gaby AR, Wright JV. Nutritional Therapy in Medical Practice. Proceedings from Nutritional Therapy in Medical Practice Conference, Seattle, WA, Oct 25–8, 1996, 33; gaby@halcyon.com.

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