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Triotann-S Pediatric®

Drug Information

This drug is a combination of two antihistamines, pyrilamine and chlorpheniramine, and a decongestant, phenylephrine. Triotann-S is used to treat symptoms associated with the common cold and hay fever, such as runny nose, itchy eyes, and sneezing.

Common brand names:

AllerTan, Nalax A 12, Triotann-S Pediatric

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • Asian Ginseng

    Laboratory studies have shown that compounds found in Panax ginseng enhance the ability of phenylephrine to constrict blood vessels.1 Controlled studies are necessary to determine whether taking Panax ginseng at the same time as phenylephrine will enhance the beneficial effects of the drug.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • Henbane

    Antihistamines, including chlorpheniramine, can cause “anticholinergic” side effects such as dryness of mouth and heart palpitations. Henbane (Hyoscyamus niger) also has anticholinergic activity and side effects. Therefore, use of henbane with chlorpheniramine could increase the risk of anticholinergic side effects,2 though apparently no interactions have yet been reported. Henbane should not be taken except by prescription from a physician trained in its use, as it is extremely toxic.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Explanation Required 

  • Fo-Ti

    Many drugs used in the treatment of high blood pressure cause relaxation or dilation of blood vessels. Laboratory studies show that emodin, a compound in Polygonum multiflorum, also relaxes blood vessels. However, animal studies reveal that phenylephrine blocks the action of emodin.4 Controlled studies are needed to determine whether Polygonum multiflorum helps people with high blood pressure and whether phenylephrine blocks its beneficial effects.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

References

1. Kwan CY. Vascular effects of selected antiphypertensive drugs derived from traditional medicinal herbs. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 1995;22 Suppl 1:S297–9.

2. Blumenthal M, ed. The Complete German Commission E Monographs. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council, 1998, 146.

3. Blumenthal M, ed. The Complete German Commission E Monographs. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council, 1998, 146.

4. Huang HC, Lee CR, Chao PD, et al. Vasorelaxant effect of emodin, an anthraquinone from a Chinese herb. Eur J Pharmacol 1991;205:289–94.

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