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Trazodone

Drug Information

Trazodone is a weak serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug with other effects on brain neurotransmitters. It is used to treat people with depression. It is also used to treat people during cocaine withdrawal.

Common brand names:

Desyrel

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • Digitalis

    Digitalis (Digitalis lanata, Digitalis purpurea) refers to a family of plants commonly called foxglove that contain digitalis glycosides, chemicals with actions and toxicities similar to the prescription drug digoxin.

    Trazodone was associated with increased serum digoxin levels in one case report.1 No interactions between trazodone and digitalis have been reported. Until more is known, trazodone and digitalis-containing products should be used only under the direct supervision of a doctor trained in their use.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Ginkgo

    There is one case report of an elderly patient with Alzheimer’s disease going into a coma while concurrently using trazodone and ginkgo.2 Until more is known, ginkgo should not be combined with trazodone except under supervision of a doctor.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • St. John’s Wort

    One report described a case of serotonin syndrome in a patient who took St. John’s wort and trazodone.3 The patient reportedly experienced mental confusion, muscle twitching, sweating, flushing, and ataxia. Until more is known, St. John’s wort should not be combined with trazodone except under expert clinical supervision.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Explanation Required 

  • none

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

References

1. Rauch PK, Jenike MA. Digoxin toxicity possibly precipitated by trazodone. Psychosomatics 1984;25:334–5.

2. Galluzzi S, Zanetti O, Binetti G, et al. Coma in a patient with Alzheimer’s disease taking low dose trazodone and Ginkgo biloba. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2000;68:679–80.

3. Demott K. St. John’s wort tied to serotonin syndrome. Clinical Psychiatry News 1998;26:28.

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