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Casein Protein for Weight Management

Why Use

Casein Protein

Why Do Dieters Use It?*

High-protein diets may be effective for weight loss, and some dieters say protein supplements such as casein are convenient to use while dieting.

What Do the Advocates Say?*

Some weight management professionals claim casein may aid weight loss due to its effect on appetite, calorie burning, and body composition.
*Dieters and weight-management advocates may claim benefits for this supplement based on their personal or professional experience. These are individual opinions and testimonials that may or may not be supported by controlled clinical studies or published scientific articles.

Dosage & Side Effects

Casein Protein

How Much Is Usually Taken by Dieters?

Dieters can make or purchase protein shakes containing casein alone or in combination with other proteins, but whether casein is more effective than other proteins is unclear. In a controlled trial,1 a weight loss and weight training program that included 1.5 grams per day of casein per 2.2 lbs body weight resulted in the same amount of weight loss as a similar program that used whey protein, but more body fat was lost by the group using casein.

Side Effects

People who are allergic to dairy products could react to casein protein and so should avoid it. Predigested casein protein may cause fewer reactions in people with dairy allergies, but may nonetheless cause reactions in some.2

Some, though not all, preliminary research has suggested that diets high in milk products, and therefore high in casein, might be associated with increased risk of type 1 diabetes and heart disease.3 , 4 One type of casein protein has been suggested as the possible contributor to these diseases,5 , 6 but other milk proteins have also been implicated in type 1 diabetes,7 and other components of dairy products, such as saturated fat and cholesterol are known to increase heart disease risk.8 , 9 , 10 At this time, whether casein protein plays a role in the causation of type 1 diabetes or heart disease is unclear and requires more research.

Animal and preliminary human research has also suggested that some types of casein protein might be associated with increased risk or severity of autism.11 Uncontrolled trials have suggested that eliminating sources of casein as well as gluten or other proteins may reduce symptoms of autism to some degree.12 Controlled studies have also reported promising results,13 , 14 but have been criticized,15 and a double-blind trial found no effect of a casein- and gluten-free diet on autism symptoms.16 More research is needed to further explore any potential link between casein protein and autism.

Animal research has suggested that a diet high in casein protein (but not a diet with similar amounts of plant proteins) might increase cancer risk.17 , 18 , 19 No human research has specifically studied casein protein as a potential cancer risk. Preliminary human studies of dairy foods, which are high in casein, find little association between high dairy consumption and cancer risk. For example, milk consumption may be associated with small increases in prostate cancer risk,20 and small decreases in colorectal cancer risk,21 but no change in risk for other cancers.22 More research is needed to determine whether regular use of casein protein supplements affects cancer risk.

As with protein in general, long-term, excessive intake of casein protein may be associated with deteriorating kidney function and possibly osteoporosis. However, neither kidney nor bone problems have been directly associated with casein consumption, and the other dietary sources of protein typically contribute more protein to the diet than does casein.

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

More Resources

Casein Protein

Where to Find It

Milk protein is 70 to 80% casein, so milk, yogurt, cheese and other dairy products are high in casein. Nondairy foods sometimes contain added casein as a whitening or thickening agent. Casein is also used in some protein supplements.

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