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Krill Oil

Uses

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
Dysmenorrhea
2 grams daily for one month; after that, 2 grams per day beginning eight days prior to menstruation and continuing for two days after the start 
Women who took krill oil had improved abdominal pain and reported using fewer pain relievers for menstrual pain than those who took fish oil in one study.
In a double-blind trial, women with PMS took 2 grams of either krill oil from Antarctic krill (a zooplankton crustacean) or fish oil for one month, followed by two months in which the women took their supplement beginning eight days prior to menstruation and continuing for two days after the start of menstruation. While abdominal pain symptoms were similarly reduced by either oil, those taking krill oil reported using fewer pain relievers for menstrual pain.5
2 Stars
High Cholesterol
1 to 3 grams krill oil daily
In one study of people with high cholesterol or triglycerides, supplementing with krill oil lowered total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-cholesterol.
In a double-blind study of people with elevated blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, supplementing with 1 to 3 grams per day of krill oil from Antarctic krill (a zooplankton crustacean) for three months decreased total and LDL cholesterol levels and increased HDL cholesterol levels. Krill oil was significantly more effective than either a placebo or small amounts of regular fish oil containing 900 mg per day of omega-3 fatty acids.6
2 Stars
High Triglycerides
2 to 3 grams per day
Supplementing with krill oil may decrease triglycerides in people with elevated levels.
In a double-blind study of people with elevated blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, supplementation with 2 to 3 grams per day of krill oil from Antarctic krill (a zooplankton crustacean) for three months decreased levels of triglycerides. However, 1 to 1.5 grams per day was not effective. Krill oil was significantly more effective than either a placebo or small amounts of regular fish oil containing 900 mg per day of omega-3 fatty acids.7
2 Stars
Osteoarthritis
300 mg per day
In one study, people who took krill oil saw significant reduction in arthritis severity and used less pain-relief medication than those taking placebo.
In a double-blind study, people with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an indicator of systemic inflammation in the body, most of whom also had osteoarthritis, were given 300 mg each morning of krill oil from Antarctic krill (a zooplankton crustacean) or a placebo. After one month those taking krill oil had significantly greater reduction in arthritis severity based on a questionnaire focusing on joint pain, stiffness, and loss of function related to osteoarthritis of the knee and hip. Use of pain-relief medication was also reduced compared to those taking placebo.8
2 Stars
Premenstrual Syndrome
2 grams daily for one month; after that, 2 grams per day beginning eight days prior to menstruation and continuing for two days after the start 
Krill oil has been shown in a double-blind trial to be an effective treatment for premenstrual syndrome, including emotional symptoms and breast tenderness.
Krill oil from Antarctic krill (a zooplankton crustacean) has been shown in a double-blind trial to be an effective treatment for premenstrual syndrome. Krill oil was significantly more effective than similar amounts of regular fish oil in relieving emotional symptoms and breast tenderness related to premenstrual syndrome. The amount of krill oil used in this study was 2 grams per day for the first month. In the second and third months the women took 2 grams per day beginning eight days prior to menstruation and continuing for two days after the start of menstruation.9

How It Works

How to Use It

To improve blood lipid levels, 1 to 3 grams per day has been used. To help PMS and menstrual pain symptoms, 2 grams per day has been used. To reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis, 300 mg per day has been used.

Where to Find It

Krill is not edible seafood; therefore, only dietary supplements are sources for krill oil.

Possible Deficiencies

There is no human requirement for krill oil. However, some researchers and doctors believe that most people who eat a typical western diet are likely to be consuming less-than-optimal amounts of EPA and DHA, which are supplied by krill oil.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

Since krill oil is obtained from species related to shrimp, people with shrimp allergies might also react to krill oil. Also, some potential hazards of high omega-3 fatty acid intakes for some people that have been suggested relative to fish oil might also apply to krill oil. No side effects from taking krill oil supplements have been reported, but human trials have not closely monitored people taking krill oil for adverse effects.

References

1. Tou JC, Jaczynski J, Chen YC. Krill for human consumption: nutritional value and potential health benefits. Nutr Rev 2007;65:63–77 [review].

2. Bottino NR. Lipid composition of two species of Antarctic krill: Euphausia superba and E. crystallorophias. Comp Biochem Physiol B 1975;50:479–84.

3. Tou JC, Jaczynski J, Chen YC. Krill for human consumption: nutritional value and potential health benefits. Nutr Rev 2007;65:63–77 [review].

4. Venkatraman JT, Chandrasekar B, Kim JD, Fernandes G. Effects of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the activities and expression of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in autoimmune-prone NZBxNZW F1 mice. Lipids 1994;29:561–68.

5. Sampalis F, Bunea R, Pelland MF, et al. Evaluation of the effects of Neptune Krill Oil on the management of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea. Altern Med Rev 2003;8:171–9.

6. Bunea R, El Farrah K, Deutsch L. Evaluation of the effects of Neptune Krill Oil on the clinical course of hyperlipidemia. Altern Med Rev 2004;9:420–28.

7. Bunea R, El Farrah K, Deutsch L. Evaluation of the effects of Neptune Krill Oil on the clinical course of hyperlipidemia. Altern Med Rev 2004;9:420–28.

8. Deutsch L. Evaluation of the effect of Neptune Krill Oil on chronic inflammation and arthritic symptoms. J Am Coll Nutr 2007;26:39–48.

9. Sampalis F, Bunea R, Pelland MF, et al. Evaluation of the effects of Neptune Krill Oil on the management of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea. Altern Med Rev 2003;8:171–9.

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