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Tests and Procedures for Peripheral Artery Disease

541-222-7218; 888-240-6484 (toll free)

Your doctor will conduct a physical examination to make a proper diagnosis. In some cases, your doctor can tell if there is a blockage by checking major pulses and by listening to your blood flow through your arteries. But to be sure, your doctor may call for additional tests, including:

Carotid duplex ultrasound is a noninvasive 15-30-minute test that uses high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to detect blood clots, plaque (fatty material), or other problems with blood flow in the arteries in the neck that carry blood to the head and brain.

Duplex ultrasound is another noninvasive 15-30-minute procedure that uses ultrasound to measure the speed of the blood flow and to detect blood clots, plaque (fatty material), or other problems with blood flow in the arteries. The test combines the two types of sound waves used in carotid duplex ultrasound and in Doppler ultrasound.

Arteriography—also called angiography—is a general term for a minimally invasive test that uses x-rays to examine arteries. The image created by the x-ray is called an arteriogram or angiogram. The procedure, which varies slightly depending on the site of the artery being examined, takes place in the hospital and involves a local anesthetic and a mild sedative.

Renal arteriography—also called renal angiography—uses x-rays to examine the arteries of the kidneys.

A computed tomography (CT) scan—also called a computed axial tomography (CAT) scan—is a noninvasive, painless 15-30-minute test that uses an x-ray to make detailed pictures of structures inside the body. Directed by a scanner, the x-ray beam circles the body, helping produce many images. The images are stored in a computer and can be printed on film or viewed on a monitor. The computer can create three-dimensional models of parts of the body by assembling the individual images.

Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)—also called magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging—is a noninvasive 30-90-minute test that uses powerful but harmless magnets and radio waves to make detailed pictures of arteries and veins. The images are stored in a computer and can be printed on film or viewed on a monitor. MRA can often detect problems in arteries or veins that x-rays and other forms of imaging cannot. The test takes place in the outpatient center.

Contact us at the number above to learn more about these and other services available at Oregon Heart & Vascular Institute.

 
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