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Surgical Procedures for Peripheral Artery Disease

541-222-7218; 888-240-6484 (toll free)

Several surgical procedures are used to treat peripheral artery disease.

Abdominal aortic bypass is performed in the hospital by a team of medical professionals led by a thoracic surgeon (doctor specializing in surgery of the heart, chest and lungs) or a vascular surgeon (doctor specializing in the treatment of blood vessels) to repair or reroute blood around an aneurysm (bulge) in the aorta, the main artery that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body. The procedure is done before the aneurysm is dangerously large. If the aneurysm is in danger of bursting, surgery is done to remove it.

Mesenteric bypass is a procedure performed in the hospital by a team of medical professionals led by a vascular surgeon (doctor specializing in the treatment of blood vessels) to reroute blood around blocked or damaged mesenteric arteries. The three mesenteric arteries carry blood to the intestines.

A carotid endarterectomy is a procedure performed in the hospital by a team of medical professionals led by a vascular surgeon (doctor specializing in the treatment of blood vessels) to remove plaque (fatty material) from the carotid arteries, which carry blood to the head and brain. Blocked carotid arteries can lead to stroke.

Femoropopliteal bypass is a procedure performed in the hospital by a team of medical professionals led by a vascular surgeon (doctor specializing in the treatment of blood vessels) to reroute blood around blocked or damaged femoral or popliteal arteries. The femoral artery is the main artery that goes through the thigh. As it goes behind the knee, it becomes the popliteal artery. Femoropopliteal bypass surgery is performed when the blockage—known as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)—is severe enough to damage the nerves and tissues of the legs and feet.

Tibioperoneal bypass is a procedure performed in the hospital by a team of medical professionals led by a vascular surgeon (doctor specializing in the treatment of blood vessels) to reroute blood around blocked or damaged tibial arteries. These are the arteries in the lower part of the leg. Two tibial arteries go through each leg. Tibioperoneal bypass surgery is performed when the blockage—known as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)—is severe enough to damage the nerves and tissues of the legs and feet.

Contact us at the numbers above to learn more about these and other services available at Oregon Heart & Vascular Institute.

 
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