Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important
It is possible that the main title of the report Porphyria Cutanea Tarda is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase deficiency
  • UROD deficiency

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Summary
Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is a rare disorder characterized by painful, blistering skin lesions that develop on sun-exposed skin (photosensitivity). Affected skin is fragile and may peel or blister after minor trauma. Liver abnormalities may also occur. PCT is caused by deficient levels of an enzyme known as uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD). In approximately 75% to 80% of cases this deficiency is acquired (PCT type 1 or sporadic PCT); in the remaining cases, individuals have a genetic predisposition to developing the disorder, specifically a mutation in the UROD gene (PCT type 2 or familial PCT). Most individuals with this genetic mutation do not develop PCT; the mutation is a predisposing factor and additional factors are required for the development of the disorder in these individuals. These factors are called susceptibility factors and are required for the development of both sporadic and familial PCT. Generally, PCT develops in mid to late adulthood. In extremely rare cases, individuals have mutations in both UROD genes. This autosomal recessive form of familial PCT is known as hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP). HEP occurs in childhood and is usually more severe than PCT types 1 or 2. NORD has a separate report on HEP.

Introduction
PCT belongs to a group of disorders known as the porphyrias. This group of at least seven disorders is characterized by abnormally high levels of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors due to deficiency of certain enzymes essential to the creation (synthesis) of heme, a part of hemoglobin and other hemoproteins. There are eight enzymes in the pathway for making heme and at least seven major forms of porphyria. The symptoms associated with the various forms of porphyria differ. It is important to note that people who have one type of porphyria do not develop any of the other types. Porphyrias are generally classified into two groups: the "hepatic" and "erythropoietic" types. Porphyrins and porphyrin precursors and related substances originate in excess amounts predominantly from the liver in the hepatic types and mostly from the bone marrow in the erythropoietic types. Porphyrias with skin manifestations are sometimes referred to as "cutaneous porphyrias." The term "acute porphyria" is used to describe porphyrias that can be associated with sudden attacks of pain and other neurological symptoms. Most forms of porphyria are genetic inborn errors of metabolism. PCT is an acquired liver disease, in which some individuals have a genetic predisposition to developing the disorder.

Resources

American Porphyria Foundation
4900 Woodway, Suite 780
Houston, TX 77056-1837
Tel: (713)266-9617
Fax: (713)840-9552
Tel: (866)273-3635
Email: porphyrus@aol.com
Internet: http://www.porphyriafoundation.com

NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases
Office of Communications & Public Liaison
Bldg 31, Rm 9A06
31 Center Drive, MSC 2560
Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
Tel: (301)496-3583
Email: NDDIC@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/

British Porphyria Association
136 Devonshire Rd
Durham City, DH1 2BL
United Kingdom
Tel: 01474369231
Email: helpline@porphyria.org.uk
Internet: http://www.porphyria.org.uk

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223
Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  9/5/2013
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